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  #1  
Old 10-28-2016
1234 1234 is offline
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Default Lee Hyun Il Korea best evergreen MS player

Lee Hyun Il is definitely Korean best MS player. At such an old age, he is still able to play so well and win over younger players who are higher ranked than him. I feel that this player can definitely play on till he is 50 years old. Despite 36 years old now he is doing such a good job performing well in tournaments. Good luck.
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Old 10-28-2016
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Default Goh V Shem and Tan Wee Kiong Rio Olympics 2016 silver medallists

He is definitely the best MS player that Korea has ever produced.

Last edited by 1234; 10-28-2016 at 06:34 AM.
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Old 10-28-2016
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Keep up the good work. I believe that can win more titles in the days to come.

Last edited by 1234; 10-28-2016 at 06:36 AM.
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Old 10-28-2016
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I certainly salute him. He has what it takes to be a successful MS player ever.

Last edited by 1234; 10-28-2016 at 06:38 AM.
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  #5  
Old 10-29-2016
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Lee Hyun Il
AGE : 36 (04/17/1980)
PLACE OF BIRTH: Seoul, South Korea
HEIGHT : 5.8" (176cm)
RESIDENCE : Seoul, South Korea
STYLE OF PLAY : Offensive
PLAYS :
COACH: Shon Seung Mo
PROFESSIONAL SINCE : In 1997, Badminton Asia Championships
NATIONAL TEAM MEMBER : Since I was 15 years old
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  #6  
Old 10-29-2016
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PROFILE
Any previous Olympics Games competed in and results?
"Beijing 2008 (4th)"

When and where you began playing this sport, and why this sport?
"12 years old, recommended by a teacher"
Your equipment sponsor and current racket model?
"Victor"

Your training regime?
"6 times a week, 5 hours a day"
Memorable sporting achievements?
"2002 Busan Asian Games winner"

Sporting ambitions?
"To win an Olympic medal"
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  #7  
Old 10-29-2016
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Here is an article related to Lee Hyun Il when he played in the MS finals of Korea Open 2008


The Badminton Exclusive Article: Controversy and emotions ran high on the courts today in Seoul as a fought nearly broke out between World Number 1 Lin Dan and Korean Coach Li Mao.
It all started with a line call that was wrong. The umpire corrected it. Then another one. The umpire corrected that too. And then two more. Four incorrect line calls against the same player. Smells fishy? Luckily, the umpire managed to adjust all the four incorrect calls.
Already very much in doubt with the linesmen's ability to be impartial, Lin Dan continued playing. On the surface, everything seemed cool, calm, collected. On the inside, Lin Dan was boiling. The hot tempered Lin managed to keep his temper in control, just as long as the calls were corrected.
Then came a line call that went against Lin. Immediately, Lin appealed to the umpire to once again, change it. Unfortunately, the umpire did not have a clear view of the shuttle, and following protocol, did not change the call. Incensed, Lin Dan shouted at the umpire. He then directed his anger to his opponent Hyun Il, and then threw his racquet, which, intentionally or not, landed near Korean Coach Li Mao.
There has already been history and bad blood between this two players. The most controversial one is the one involving Li Yongbo's remark to 'break Lee Chong Wei's leg'. Fuming, Li Mao shouts at the sideline at Lin Dan. The Chinese coaches too, streamed out to protect their charge. Li Mao then pushes Li aside. A fight nearly broke out, with heated words being exchanged between the two parties.
Meanwhile on the court, Lin Dan confronts Lee Hyun Il, while Korean Coach Ha Tae Kwon attempts to calm the situation, but was pushed provokingly by Lin Dan. Luckily, the game referees were on the court and were able to arrest the situation before it degenerated into further chaos. The shouting match between Lin Dan and Li Mao continued, and was finally stopped after Lin Dan was given a yellow card.
After Lee Hyun Il won the 3rd game by the thinnest of margins, he was back to his humble and polite self. However, when asked about the incident, Lee said that Lin asked: "You saw that shot! Wasn't it out?.
This is a disgraceful incident. Lin Dan and to some extent, Li Mao are to blame for this dramatic but shameful encounter. Lin Dan, if you cannot control your emotions, don't be a badminton player. This is not your personal theatre or a boxing ring. Many other players, including Taufik Hidayat and Lee Chong Wei both have had similar unfair incidents, but did not react so selfishly and rudely as you. You are giving a bad name to the sport by nearly starting a fight. Luckily the situation was controlled shortly. Live with it. Let it go. If you cannot handle bad line calls, you don't deserve to be a top player.
I call for the BWF to take action and investigate this incident involving Lin Dan for his blatant disregard for the officials and the blatant disrespect he has shown for the game. Send a message that wherever you are, whenever you play, remember you are representing a sport with a community of more than 1 billion people. Send it as a warning to all that dare shame this sport.
Li Mao too, is to be blamed to a certain extent. He should not have reacted to Lin Dan's action. Forget and move on. Instead of his personal egos, he should have ignored Lin Dan's action, no matter how incendiary. Coaches are supposedly to be matured and calm. It does no one no good when one loses his temper like that.
Hopefully there will be no repeat of this incident.
PS: I have been informed that Lin Dan threw the racquet AFTER the match, not during the incident.
PS: I am not saying that the system and the Korean adjudication were not to blame. They are to blame, together with the China Open's organisers last year. However, I did not condemn Lee Chong Wei last year because he did not start shouting, shoving and throwing racquets at the umpire, the other player or other coaches.
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Old 10-30-2016
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Lee signed a two-year deal with Malaysian equipment manufacturer Apacs in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday. The 34-year-old South Korean came out of his second retirement last fall to capture the Korea Grand Prix Gold in Jeonju by defeating Ji Hoon Hong 21-18 21-12.



When asked about rumors of him being selected for the 2014 Incheon Asian Games squad, Lee said: “it’s not a done deal yet; I still need to discuss this with Badminton Korea Association (BKA)."

"Currently, I just want to enjoy the game without associating with the national team. I feel physically and mentally exhausted after playing for the national team for more than 10 years," added Hyun-il.
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Old 10-30-2016
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Hyun Il stops Taufik to reach semis
Friday, December 2, 2011 - Badmintonphoto archive

Former world and Olympic champion Taufik Hidayat’s (below), quest to win his first title of the year ended in misery once again, this time in the quarter-finals of the US$200,000 Macau Open.

Taufik Hidayat (NR,qf)The Indonesian, who has dropped to No. 9 in the world rankings, was the highest seed left in the competition before Friday’s quarter-finals as the top two seeds, Lee Chong Wei of Malaysia and China’s Lin Dan, withdrew for personal reasons.

Their absence, however, failed to inspire Taufik, who struggled in his earlier three matches before finding South Korea’s Lee Hyun Il too hot to handle.

Hyun Il, like Taufik a former world No. 1, had retired from the game after the 2008 Olympics, but made a comeback last year and is still searching for a tournament victory in his second coming.

He gave himself a great chance of ending that drought when he took out Taufik in three games, winning 12-21, 21-15, 21-17 in 66 minutes.

He will now meet Malaysia’s Hafiz Hashim in the semi-finals. The 2003 All England champion upset Japan’s Kenichi Tago in straight games, taking 43 minutes to beat the eighth seed 21-14, 21-19.
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Old 10-30-2016
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Korea’s Lee Hyun Il enjoys a good run at home as he prepares to take his one-man show back on the road.



Korea’s most successful men’s singles star Lee Hyun Il is back from retirement a third time and hopes his performance at the Korea Grand Prix Gold in Jeonju will push him back into a successful international career.

After a decisive win against Korea’s current #1 Lee Dong Keun in Korea’s summer championships, Lee Hyun Il has just beaten Indonesian veteran Simon Santoso in a one-sided contest and he looks strong to take back the title he won in 2011.

“I’ve never really stopped training and the match experience I’ve had here in Korea and in the team tournaments in Southeast Asia earlier this year seems to have kept me sharp,” said Lee after his victory over Santoso. 43“Plus the instincts and experience I have gained throughout my career have never left me.”


Lee first left the Korean national team in 2007 citing weariness with the demanding lifestyle. Although he was back that time after just a few months, he retired again following each of the next two Olympic Games, in both of which he came up short in the bronze medal match. But for a third time, he is returning to international competition, only this time the national team is not part of the equation.

Lee is one of several players who are quite happy staying with badminton while at the same time welcoming the end of their life in the national training centre, where even those with spouses and children are required to live in a common dormitory and share a room with a team-mate.

“Actually, the training itself is just as demanding whether it’s the national team or my pro team. The big difference is the off-court part because on the national team you live together and travel together with your team-mates nearly all the time.

“I’ve been getting some really good training with my Saemaeul team-mates. Park Sung Min is a very good player and Hong Ji Hoon and Lee Dong Keun play for the Seoul Yonex team and they train right next to us so I can spar with them.


“Those three are all on the national team but with two big domestic tournaments this fall, they’ve been back playing with their own teams for much of the last two months so that’s been good preparation.

“It’s a totally different lifestyle just being a member of pro team, though. I don’t have to live with my team-mates at the training centre. I can live at home, with my family. There’s a lot more freedom. I have a wife and a five-year-old daughter so this is really important.”

However, unlike some of the other ‘internationally retired’ players who were in action this week in Jeonju – such as Kim Min Jung or Han Sang Hoon – Lee Hyun Il has cast his net beyond Korea. In charting a course independent of a thriving national team system, he is following a trend already familiar in places like Malaysia and Indonesia but virtually unheard-of in Korea.

“I registered for the Malaysia International Challenge next week in Kuching but because I have no ranking points, I’m way down on the reserve list so I think I’ll just have to cancel.

“From next year, though, I hope to enter more, starting with some smaller ones until I can get some ranking points, and then moving on from there.


“I had a good experience with both the Djarum league and the Axiata Cup, with good results – my team actually won the Indonesian league – so I hope to play those again. Because these are not BWF ranking events, it was much easier to get approval from the Association to play in them.

“I was also asked to participate in the Indian Badminton League but I couldn’t due to conflicts with some tournaments here in Korea. I hope to next year if the scheduling works out. The China League teams are only looking for top-ranked players, though, and I wasn’t invited. I think some other Korean players are interested in playing it.

“If I go abroad for tournaments, it won’t be with any team. I’ll be on my own with just a manager who is not part of either organization.”

Looking ahead to his next match against Tian Houwei (pictured), the man who beat world #1 Lee Chong Wei in Australia last spring, Lee said, “Oh that was him was it? I don’t think I’ve ever even seen him play before but I won’t be focussing on who he’s beaten. Ultimately it will be the match he and I play that matters.

“The younger players are bound to have the edge on me in power and stamina. I’ll just have to try to rely on my experience.”
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